About Us

A Few Words About Us

Vortex NTNU is an independent student organization at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, Norway. Our team is composed of students from different engineering disciplines from bachelor and master degree programs.

Each year up until 2019 we have conceived, designed, and built an ROV from scratch to compete in the MATE international ROV competition. This year we have developed as an organization and made our first autonomous vehicle (AUV). This means we will be entering a new competition and face different challenges to push our boundaries further. We dive headfirst into this new challenge and are eager to improve our skills in engineering, teamwork and development of autonomous systems.

We are passionate about science and technology, and we provide an ideal opportunity for ambitious students to explore and develop their talents and skills in a collaborative undertaking. Through the project, we demonstrate that we can deliver a complex and integrated product in the demanding environment of an underwater competition.

What is an AUV?

An Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) is an unmanned vehicle which performs its mission without being directly controlled by a human operator. AUVs use advanced perception and control technology in order to locate and solve tasks in possibly harsh and challenging subsea environments.

Mounted thrusters allow full navigation forward, backward, sideways; and even rotation around the vehicle's own axis is possible. The mobile device may have video cameras, lights, various types of sensors, sonar capabilities as well as manipulator and cutting arms.

AUVs are often designed, programmed and armed for specific purposes, like scientific research or maintenance in commercial industries. The possibilities are endless and future problems will demand more and more autonomous technology and automatic systems with minimal human supervision.

Our Values

Commitment

Commitment

We are committed to fulfill our responsibilities as an individual and as a team to accomplish our goals through optimum effort. With consideration to safety in all our actions, shall we strive to deliver impeccable work beyond what is expected.

Teamwork

Teamwork

We believe a solid foundation for teamwork is a key factor for success. The state of cohesion we experience trough the project is what makes us who we are as an organization. Team spirit is essential to recognize the individual qualities, and strengthen our overall team performance..

Innovation

Innovation

Each year we strive to make a unique product without limitations from our previous projects. Innovation is crucial to find great solutions to difficult problems, and improving our product even further.

Our Story

It all started in 2015; a small group of six students from different disciplines at NTNU took their homework a step further; instead of only designing a ROV on paper, they wanted to realize the design by building a real ROV. The possibility of participating in the MATE international ROV competition at NASA"s facilities motivated the group even more. Vortex became a project, and it was positively received by the students at NTNU. People were eagerly applying to join, and it quickly became a 20 members project team.

Just as other startups, the lack of experience presented the team a great deal of challenges, setbacks and frustration. However, the commitment and unwillingness to give up the initial idea of Vortex allowed the team to complete the construction of the ROV. The team managed to secure an overall 16th place out of 31 teams in the competition debut - securing a successful end to the project.

After achieving what the team was originally set out to do, it became a programme. The only ROV programme at NTNU. Because, the team realized it developed into something bigger; a platform for students to apply their knowledge on concrete tasks by developing a fully functioning ROV.

Maelstrom

Assembly of Maelstrom at the MATE international ROV competition


ISS

Overview of a full-scale mock-up of the International Space Station (ISS) at NASA’s Neutral Buoyancy Lab in Houston, Texas